2015 Cradle to Cradle Product Design Challenge

The goal of this design challenge is to eliminate the concept of “waste” by designing products with materials that may be perpetually cycled to retain their value as nutrients to fuel growing global economies.

The challenge is sponsored by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute in partnership with Autodesk, in support of the design-led revolution. It is directly tied to the launch of a new online education program for product designers made possible by the Alcoa Foundation. The free, self-paced, on-line course provides strategies, tools, and examples of the Cradle to Cradle design principles leading to Cradle to Cradle Certified products.

This contest is open to design students and design professionals who have completed the on-line Cradle to Cradle Product Design program. The submission deadline is December 1, 2015.

UK firm makes biodegradable construction glove

Read the full story in Construction Week.

UK-headquartered Globus has launched what it claims is the world’s first fully biodegradable, synthetic work glove.

The Showa 4552’s liner and sponge nitrate feature the manufacturer’s Eco Best Technology (EBT), and have been designed to protect workers from hand injuries.

Apple, Microsoft, Motorola wring new revenue out of e-waste

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

What do Apple, Microsoft and Motorola have in common?

All of these high-profile technology companies are harvesting new revenue out of discarded and end-of-life gadgets, rather than looking at them just as liabilities that require responsible recycling. What’s more, all three are among the roughly 100 organizations using Hong Kong’s Li Tong Group (aka LTG) to get the job done.

How the circular economy is taking off in the US

Read the full story in The Guardian.

Laptops made of plastic from old laptops. Aluminium car body parts made from old cars. Chemicals leased out, recovered, and leased again. These are just a few examples of how the circular economy, once seen as a Scandinavian speciality, is starting to spin in the United States.

Defining the circular economy

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

Speedo is making swimwear out of factory textile scraps. Ford is turning old floor mats into engine components. And battery manufacturers are turning old batteries into — well, new batteries.

A successor to old school “reduce, reuse, recycle” mantras, these examples of unconventional material re-purposing help illustrate the much-hyped circular economy — a more ambitious, and more marketing-friendly, rethinking of how product materials and packaging can be cycled back into supply chains.

The Latest Thing in Green: FIT students test environmentally friendly ways to reuse textiles

Read the full story in the Wall Street Journal.

Mention the Fashion Institute of Technology, and green innovation isn’t the first thing that springs to mind. But two FIT students are undertaking a project that they hope will make the fashion industry’s use of textiles more environmentally friendly.

While the recycling of plastic, aluminum and paper is now commonplace, the recycling of organic fabric is rare, because no one has come up with an easy, environmentally friendly way to do it.

But Lydia Baird and Willa Tsokanis hope to change that. Students in FIT’s textile development and marketing program, they found themselves asking why the school routinely tossed out reams of muslin, a cheap strain of cotton used throughout the industry to test designs, once students were finished with it. While biodegradable, it takes longer to break down when mixed with other landfill refuse.