Developing Your Own Waste Reduction Plan

Read the full post from the Iowa Waste Reduction Center.

We often share stories about businesses that are able to become landfill-free, reduce their environmental footprint or improve waste reduction. These efforts have made significant economic and environmental advancements for businesses, large and small but we have never really outlined the steps it takes to get there.

With the difficulties and rising costs of managing waste, businesses are recognizing that reducing waste ends up reducing the need for raw materials, office supplies and even equipment. Another huge benefit is the cost savings from reducing disposal costs. Businesses can achieve greater overall efficiency, a positive public image and save money.

If your business is serious about wanting to reduce its waste, the first step would be to develop a waste reduction plan. Plans can range from simple one-step recycling plans to complex strategies focusing on all aspects of operation. Whether you want to develop a simple or complex plan, here are the basic steps to get started.

The Dark Side of Recycling Lighter Electronics

Read the full post at Waste360.

It seems that every year electronic devices are getting smaller and thinner, yet they pack in more functions and versatility. While this is great for consumers wanting the latest products, it has different consequences for those of us concerned about recycling electronics at their end of life.

New campus recycling bins aim to bring waste awareness

Read the full story in the Daily Illini.

In an effort to make campus more eco-friendly and closer to a zero-waste initiative, 20 new recycling bins with standardized signage were installed on the Quad this month, making 30 total recycling/landfill stations.

The project was completed by the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center (ISTC). According to the project’s leader Bart Bartels, technical assistance engineer at ISTC, the center makes recommendations and completes projects aiming to reduce waste emissions on campus.

This zero-waste initiative is part of the goal of the Illinois Climate Action Plan (iCAP), the University’s mission to make campus carbon neutral by 2050.

It’s About Time New York Solved Its Trash Problem

Read the full story in CityLab.

On Wednesday, which was also Earth Day, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasioannounced a vision to overhaul the city’s garbage disposal and recycling program as a part of his 10-year “OneNYC” plan. He has two big goals: to reduce commercial waste disposal 90 percent by 2030, and to minimize the waste generated and sent out to far-away landfills. Given the city’s visible garbage problem, this plan is long overdue.

It’s time to stop managing waste and start preventing it

Read the full post at GreenBiz.

Diverting the world’s estimated 12 million tons of daily waste is no easy task. Today’s waste management strategies are often costly, cumbersome and bad for our environment.

In order to really reduce impacts on the environment while increasing profitability, companies need to aggressively shift the focus from waste management to waste prevention.

New P2 Impact column: 5 ways to reduce waste and costs on your company’s campus

In their article “5 ways to reduce waste and costs on your company’s campus”, authors Monique Dubos, Anna Arkin and Matt Domski claim that no matter what your line of business, if you have a physical workspace, you can make it more efficient and save money.

Read previous P2 Impact columns at http://www.greenbiz.com/blogs/enterprise/p2-impact.

This Year’s Super Bowl Filled 70,000 Plates on the Path to Zero Waste

Via EPA Connect.

This post is a follow-up to my “AZ I See It” column in the Arizona Republic on January 26, 2015.

This year during the Super Bowl, the first “Kick the Waste” campaign took place at Super Bowl Central—the 12-block area in the heart of downtown Phoenix where thousands enjoyed parties and live music in the week leading up to the championship game. The city was host to quite a party on Superbowl Sunday. Fans gathered for good football and good food, whether they joined in the downtown celebrations, tailgated outside the stadium, or ordered from vendors in the stands.

All too often, what’s not consumed goes to waste. Every year Americans throw away more food than any other type of waste — almost 35 million tons — and much of it is still edible. The “Kick the Waste” campaign — a collaboration between the city of Phoenix, nonprofit food rescue organization Waste Not, the National Football League, the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee, vendors and fans — worked to make sure that any leftover food was shared with those who needed a good meal, and any waste was disposed of in the most beneficial way for the environment.

The results are in from this tremendous effort, and they definitely scored a touchdown:

  • The total amount of edible food donated from the Super Bowl-related events was 69,260 pounds—enough to feed 70,000 people.
  • 73 percent of unused food was diverted through donation, recycling and composting at the Super Bowl festivities.
  • More than 120,000 aluminum beverage containers were recycled from Super Bowl Central. They weighed 3,750 pounds.

The impact doesn’t stop there. This campaign was used to test out ways for Phoenix to collect and process food waste from its residents. The city is learning from it to design a state-of-the-art composting facility at its transfer station for yard waste and food scraps.

San Francisco is already gearing up to host Super Bowl 50 festivities, and it’s got Zero Waste Event requirements already in place. The new Levi’s Stadium is packed with green features – including a green roof, water reclamation and farm-to-table dining. Outside of the Super Bowl, sports teams across the nation are collaborating with us to green the game, and almost 800 sports teams, stadiums, universities, grocery stores and a range of companies and organizations join our Food Recovery Challenge to prevent and reduce wasted food.

Congratulations to this year’s winners, the New England Patriots, and also to Phoenix and all those Super Bowl fans who kicked food waste out of the landfill and into the compost and recycling bins!

Jared Blumenfeld is the U.S. EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest