Green products

No Proof EPA Pollution Prevention Program Works as Claimed: Report

Read the full story from Bloomberg BNA.

The Environmental Protection Agency has no proof that a key pollution prevention program has cut U.S. use of hazardous materials as claimed, the agency’s inspector general said in a report.

The EPA Office of the Inspector General also has a podcast, podcast transcript, and at-a-glance report available on the OIG web site.

National Library of Medicine (NLM) Resource Update: Household Products Database (HPD) now contains over 14,000 products

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Household Products Database (HPD) now contains over 14,000 products. The latest update includes a new product category “commercial/institutional”. Product manufacturers of the more than 300 products in this category use various descriptions,  including professional grade, professional use, hospital grade and more.

Users can locate products using the new “commercial/institutional” link under “Browse by Category” on the HPD homepage or by entering the category/description terms (e.g. commercial, institutional, professional, hospital) as a Quick Search.

The Household Products Database links over 14,000 consumer brands to health effects from Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) provided by manufacturers and allows scientists and consumers to research products based on chemical ingredients. The database is designed to help answer the following typical questions:

  • What are the chemical ingredients and their percentage in specific brands?
  • Which products contain specific chemical ingredients?
  • Who manufactures a specific brand? How do I contact this manufacturer?
  • What are the acute and chronic effects of chemical ingredients in a specific brand?
  • What other information is available about chemicals in the toxicology-related databases of the National Library of Medicine?

Information in the Household Products Database is from a variety of publicly available sources including brand-specific labels and Material Safety Data Sheets when available from manufacturers and manufacturers’ web sites.

When Going Green Backfires: How Firm Intentions Shape the Evaluation of Socially Beneficial Product Enhancements

George E. Newman, Margarita Gorlin, and Ravi Dhar. “When Going Green Backfires: How Firm Intentions Shape the Evaluation of Socially Beneficial Product Enhancements.” Journal of Consumer Research: October 2014. Online at http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/677841.
Abstract: Many companies offer products with social benefits that are orthogonal to performance (e.g., green products). The present studies demonstrate that information about a company’s intentions in designing the product plays an import role in consumers’ evaluations. In particular, consumers are less likely to purchase a green product when they perceive that the company intentionally made the product better for the environment compared to when the same environmental benefit occurred as an unintended side effect. This result is explained by consumers’ lay theories about resource allocation: intended (vs. unintended) green enhancements lead consumers to assume that the company diverted resources away from product quality, which in turn drives a reduction in purchase interest. The present studies also identify an important boundary condition based on the type of enhancement and show that the basic intended (vs. unintended) effect generalizes to other types of perceived tradeoffs, such as healthfulness and taste.

9 sustainable solutions you will see in the future

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

For the third year now the international think tank Sustainia has released its “Sustainia100” guide. The idea behind the competition is to identify the 100 most promising sustainability solutions from around the world. With a focus on advocating readily available, financially viable and scalable innovations, Sustainia’s mission is to mature markets for sustainable products and services.

Consumers Want to Buy ‘Green’ Brands

Read the full story in Environmental Leader.

About 70 percent of consumers would consider switching brands if one could demonstrate better environmental credentials, according to research from sustainability nonprofit Forum for the Future.

Novelis commissioned the research to gain consumer insights into its evercan product, aluminum sheet certified to contain at least 90 percent recycled content. In April, Red Hare Brewing became the first to commercially use the evercan aluminum sheet.

Cradle to Cradle Product Registry Launches

Read the full story at Environmental Leader.

The Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute has launched a product registry designed to increase transparency from manufacturers.

The Cradle to Cradle Certified Product Registry allows designers, builders and consumers to make decisions about products. The registry includes a certification scorecard, which summarizes levels achieved in five categories: material health, material reutilization, renewable energy and carbon management, water stewardship and social fairness.