Green lifestyle

Ebay, Kindle and Skype rule among the greenest apps

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

Ebay, Skype and Kindle now have more in common than being three of the most widely used smartphone apps. They are also the best apps for promoting sustainable behavior, according to a recent study by the WSP Group, a U.K. environmental consultancy firm.

Five Easy Ways To Have A Shareable Halloween

Read the full story at Shareable.

Halloween is just around the corner, and that means ghosts and goblins everywhere will soon be showing their spooky faces.

But there’s something more terrifying than bloody corpses and flesh-hungry zombies–all the money and resources that are wasted on creating a single night of scary parties and haunted houses.

That’s why we’ve put together a quick list of easy ways to make your Halloween more Shareable. And who knows? You might just form a few new friendships along the way!

BoatUS Foundation Accepting Grant Applications for Safe and Clean Boating Projects

The BoatUS Foundation for Boating Safety and Clean Water is accepting applications to its Grassroots Grants Program, which annually awards funds to nonprofit organizations, boating clubs, and student groups in the United States that provide education about safe and clean boating.

The foundation is looking for creative projects that promote safe and clean boating on local waterways. Past topics have ranged from PSAs on the effects of boating under the influence to hands-on education about the effects of marine debris.

The language of sustainability

Read the full story in The Guardian.

Sustainable thinking has hit the mainstream. From e-readers that bypass the resource thirsty book industry, to smart meters that help householders save energy, many of the technology products that are launched these days have some kind of sustainability angle.

This is having a profound effect on the language we use and the way we think about sustainability. New technology is transforming our views about consumption and introducing new words into our lexicon that have sustainable thinking at their heart.

Seattle Assesses Fine to Homeowners for Wasting Food

Read the full story at Triple Pundit.

The push for increased sustainable methods can be seen everywhere these days — certainly when it comes to local efforts to pare down on what we toss in the landfill.

Massachusetts’ ongoing effort to increase composting throughout the state is one such example, which will require any company or facility that disposes of at least a ton of organic material a week to compost its food scraps and other compostable materials. The disposal ban takes effect on Oct. 1 and affects more than 1,500 businesses, hospitals, public offices and facilities. Connecticut and Vermont have similar bans for wasting food that exceeds a 2-ton limit on organic waste per week.

The city of Seattle has also embraced the composting idea with a bit more of a creative edge: In an effort to encourage residents to stop wasting food, the city council passed an ordinance this last Monday that allows households to be fined $1 each time that garbage collectors find more than 10 percent of organic waste in their garbage bins.

US Seed Libraries Mobilize to Protect Their Right to Share

Read the full story at Shareable.

In June, officials from the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture alerted the Joseph T. Simpson Public Library in Mechanicsburg that their seed library was in violation of the Pennsylvania Seed Act of 2004. According to officials, the library would have to follow the prohibitively expensive procedures of large-scale commercial seed companies or only offer commercial seed. The first option is impractical and the second option would gut the exchange of its primary purpose to serve home gardeners who want to save and exchange their own seed.

The Sustainable Economies Law Center (SELC) reported in a recent article on Shareable.net that the Pennsylvania law may only apply to commercial seed operations. Despite what may be an incorrect interpretation of the law, other states are now considering adopting Pennsylvania’s seed library protocol. This could kill a fast growing U.S. seed library movement.

The upside to the crackdown is that in the weeks since, seed librarians from across the country have come together. As David King, founder of the Seed Library of Los Angeles (SLOLA) puts it, “The phone lines and emails lines were burning up as the seed library community turned from shock and disbelief to mobilizing to protect their efforts.”

The goal now is to direct that energy toward protecting seed libraries, which are a cornerstone in efforts to foster the genetic diversity of food and strengthen food security.