Green business

13 companies sowing solutions for food resilience

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

Could Big Data offer the most fertile solution for countering systemic food waste and frightening future scarcity scenarios?

Last month Microsoft, Amazon Web Services, Coca-Cola, Nestlé and dozens of other companies started sowing the seeds for a crop of powerful applications and information resources enabled by the convergence of sensors, sophisticated imagery and powerful analytics — and inspired by the federal Climate Data Initiative.

Their focus: “food resilience” innovations that help agricultural businesses, farmers and food distributors more quickly understand the potential impacts of floods, rising sea levels, heat waves and droughts, downpours and other extreme weather on crop yields, transportation systems, storage and other supply-chain processes.

Science and sustainability goals: what researchers want businesses to know

Read the full story in The Guardian.

If companies are to help reach key climate targets and keep the world a viable place to do business, executives need to take a broader view – and pay attention to the latest science.

Saving Money Is No. 1 Sustainability Driver

Read the full story in Environmental Leader.

Saving money is the no. 1 reason executives give for moving towards more environmentally sustainable business practices, according to a Grant Thornton report.

The firm’s 2014 International Business Report, titled Corporate social responsibility: beyond financials, draws on more than 2,500 interviews with business leaders in 34 economies and looks at what companies are doing to make their operations more sustainable and why.

Five sustainable boondoggles: greenwashing all the way to the bank

Read the full story in The Guardian.

Painting a green veneer on consumer goods is far from a new marketing tactic. In 1992, the US Federal Trade Commission issued its first “Green Guide” aimed at squelching greenwashing long before greenwashing was a household word.

It’s hard to blame marketers – really. It’s not that hard to find low-hanging fruit: non-discerning, green-minded consumers eager to buy bright, shiny new products that will help them lighten their footprint on Mother Earth. Thankfully the volume of egregiously greenwashed boondoggles has decreased in recent years. But it has not – as we shall see below – been washed away.

We’ve picked out some of our favorite dubious green products and rated them on a scale of “meh” to “100% boondoggle”.