Green business

Your Company’s Energy Data Is an Untapped Resource

Read the full post from Harvard Business Review.

Most companies are unprepared for the emerging revolution in predictive energy analytics. In fact, many readers’ eyes will have already glazed over at the preceding sentence, with the natural initial reaction that energy-related data isn’t relevant to their jobs.

But what happens when every single light fixture in all of your company’s facilities becomes a networked mini-computer with an array of sensors? Who at your company will be put in charge of turning buildings operations from a cost center to a revenue center? These examples are not hypothetical capabilities; these are now real options for companies. And yet few corporate managers are asking such questions, much less taking advantage.

At least 150 companies prep for carbon prices

Read the full story in USA Today.

At least 150 major companies worldwide — including ExxonMobil, Google, Microsoft and 26 others in the United States — are already making business plans that assume they will be taxed on their carbon pollution, a report out today says.

How to Clean Up the Global Economy to Combat Climate Change

Read the full story in Scientific American.

The global economy will pump $90 trillion into infrastructure development over the next 15 years, sparking a series of investment decisions that will make or break the Earth’s climate, a sweeping new study out today finds.

The 2014 Dow Jones Sustainability Index: Abbott to Woolworths

Read the full story at GreenBiz.

After an annual review, 46 companies were deleted from the 15-year-old Dow Jones Sustainability World index — the three biggest (by free-float market capitalization) to be booted were Bank of America, General Electric and Schlumberger.

The good news is that 32 were added, including Amgen, Commonwealth Bank of Australia and GlaxoSmithKline.

Even better news, 16 companies have been recognized every single year: Baxter, Bayer, BMW, BT, Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Diageo, Intel, J Sainsbury, Novo Nordisk, RWE, SAP, Siemens, Storebrand, Unilever and UnitedHealth.

Are energy-efficient workplaces healthier? Just Google it

Read the full story at GreenBiz.

When people talk about the business case for energy-efficient buildings achieved through comprehensive measures like deep energy retrofits, what usually comes to mind first is lower energy bills. However, an increasing number of organizations are recognizing the value beyond energy cost savings that energy-efficient buildings provide.

Chief Sustainability Officers: Who Are They and What Do They Do?

Download the paper.

While a number of studies document that organizations go through numerous stages as they increase their commitment to sustainability over time, we know little about the role of the Chief Sustainability Officer (CSO) in this process. Using survey and interview data we analyze how a CSO’s authority and responsibilities differ across organizations that are in different stages of sustainability commitment. We document increasing organizational authority of the CSO as organizations increase their commitment to sustainability moving from the Compliance to the Efficiency and then to the Innovation stage. However, we also document a decentralization of decision rights from the CSO to different functions, largely driven by sustainability strategies becoming more idiosyncratic at the Innovation stage. The study concludes with a discussion of practices that CSOs argue to accelerate the commitment of organizations to sustainability.

Educators Say Higher Ed in Sustainability a Must; Business Execs Mostly Agree

Read the full story from Environmental Leader.

Higher education in sustainability and environmental management is more important now than ever before, some education professionals believe. While environmental work was a fringe issue decades ago, this is no longer the case. “The issue of the environment has merged with the issue of economic development. In the seventies, managers could avoid paying attention to these issues; today they can’t,” says Steve Cohen, executive director of Columbia University’s Earth Institute and consultant to the EPA.