How the circular economy is taking off in the US

Read the full story in The Guardian.

Laptops made of plastic from old laptops. Aluminium car body parts made from old cars. Chemicals leased out, recovered, and leased again. These are just a few examples of how the circular economy, once seen as a Scandinavian speciality, is starting to spin in the United States.

Latest P2 Impact column: The circular economy’s missing ingredient: Local

The latest P2 Impact column has been published over at GreenBiz. John Mulrow, Interim Director at Plant Chicago, writes about an often-overlooked aspect of the material reuse craze. Read it at https://www.greenbiz.com/article/circular-economys-missing-ingredient-local.

You can view previous P2 Impact columns at https://www.greenbiz.com/blogs/enterprise/p2-impact.

P2 Impact is a collaboration between the P2Rx Centers and GreenBiz.

Science Based Targets Call to Action Webinar

CDP, UN Global Compact, World Resources Institute and WWF invite you to a webinar on August 27 to learn more about the Science Based Targets – Call to Action, a joint campaign calling on companies to demonstrate their leadership on climate action by publicly committing to science-based GHG reduction targets. The call to action is part of the Science Based Targets initiative and the Commitments to business leadership convened by CDP and We Mean Business.

The objective of the webinar is to provide guidance and clarification for companies that have expressed interest to participate in the call to action. The following content will be discussed during the webinar:

1. Call to Action eligibility criteria
2. Process to submit targets under the call to action
3. Quality check process
4. Profiling opportunities
5. Questions and answers

Coca-Cola’s Latest Environmental Victory Is More Complicated Than It Seems

Read the full story at Huffington Post Green.

Something as simple as water winds up becoming immensely complicated in the hands of a multinational corporation like Coca-Cola.

On Tuesday, the company announced it had almost reached its goal of “replenishing” all of the water in the beverages it sold in 2014…

By “replenishing,” Coke does not literally mean it’s putting back the water it takes out of each locality where it operates. To come up with its number on replenishment, Coke and its partner, the nonprofit Nature Conservancy, measured the amount of water it reclaimed through various conservation efforts around the globe — everything from tallgrass restoration in North Texas to reforestation in Ghana to canal rehabilitation in Kyrgyzstan. The company is involved in hundreds of these projects.

“That’s not how it works,”  said Amit Srivastava of the India Resource Center, an activist group based in India that opposes corporate globalization in the country. “Water issues are local issues. You need to put water back at the source.”

H&M’s $1m recycling prize is clever but no solution to fast fashion

Read the full story in The Guardian.

The retail giant’s foundation is calling for innovative solutions to waste and pollution but critics say it’s just a way to keep the wheels of fast fashion spinning.

Defining the circular economy

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

Speedo is making swimwear out of factory textile scraps. Ford is turning old floor mats into engine components. And battery manufacturers are turning old batteries into — well, new batteries.

A successor to old school “reduce, reuse, recycle” mantras, these examples of unconventional material re-purposing help illustrate the much-hyped circular economy — a more ambitious, and more marketing-friendly, rethinking of how product materials and packaging can be cycled back into supply chains.

How a clothing company’s anti-consumerist message boosted business

Watch/read the full story from PBS NewsHour.

High-end outdoor clothing company Patagonia outfits mountain climbers, snowboarders, surfers and trail runners — athletes who subject their gear to abuse. Each day, some of that clothing makes its way back to the company’s headquarters, where workers extend the life of their customers’ products by making free repairs. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on the company’s ethos.