Green business

UK supermarket will be the first to disconnect from the grid, use electricity generated entirely by its own rotten food

Read the full post at Extreme Tech.

A supermarket in the UK will become the world’s first to be powered entirely by its own food waste. At the end of the day, any leftover food — after the good stuff has been given to charity — will be transported to a nearby anaerobic digester, where it will be turned into electricity and sent back to the store via a privately owned one-mile-long power line. When the anaerobic digester is turned on, the large grocery store will sever all connections to the national power grid and rely purely on the electricity generated by bacteria feasting on rotten food. Cool.

Why targeting 4 human emotions is key to marketing sustainability

Read the full story in The Guardian.

While brands have been remarkably successful at feeding universal human drives, such as the desire for adventure, power or status, sustainability has not been seeing the same success in its messaging. What sustainability needs to create the same impact is a similar level of insight into the best way to embrace the full range of human emotions. Because it’s human emotion that’s at the heart of what motivates us.

KC Area restaurants recycle resources

Read the full story in the Kansas City Star.

A budding movement in Kansas City is turning the spotlight of sustainability on the restaurant industry.

DuPont and GM’s lessons for closing in on zero waste

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

Every time something in your company’s production cycle gets thrown into a trash can and ends up in a landfill, you throw out some money.

A landfill-free strategy is too costly, too challenging, and too hard to implement, you say? Check out how the experts featured in Greenbiz’s recent webcast “Innovative Approaches to Recycling and Waste Reduction” did it.

6 reasons technology alone can’t solve water scarcity

Read the full story at GreenBiz.

Sustainably addressing water scarcity will require technology solutions both conventional and innovative — both the “hard path for water” and the soft path for water. The conventional “hard path for water” is characterized by centralized infrastructure and decision-making using technology and institutions developed in the 19th and 20th centuries: large dams and reservoirs, pipelines and treatment plants, public water departments and agencies and private companies.

Microsoft buys entire output of Illinois wind farm

Read the full story at GreenBiz.

Microsoft took another step toward its goal of becoming carbon neutral, announcing its second enormous purchase of wind energy.

The company signed a 20-year power purchase agreement to buy 175 megawatts (MW) of wind energy — the entire output — of Pilot Hill Wind Project in Illinois. The wind farm is 60 miles from Chicago and will supply Microsoft’s data center there through the grid.

9 key trends in corporate sustainability reporting

Read the full story at GreenBiz.

Nearly three-quarters of sustainability professionals ranked CSR above seven out of 10 in relation to their business objectives (with one being low and 10 being high.)

Meanwhile, most organizations dedicate between $34,000 and $84,000 of their budget to CSR reporting activity.

These are just some key findings from a recent 2degrees CSR reporting survey, which aims to help organizations identify key trends in CSR reporting, stakeholder engagement and materiality.

GreenBiz 101: The core of materiality? What matters most

Read the full story at GreenBiz.

If you’re a sustainability professional who got his or her start in environmental affairs, chemistry or toxicology, the word “materiality” probably wasn’t part of your core curriculum. But the concept may be invaluable when it comes to prioritizing sustainability initiatives and communicating progress toward them — especially as awareness of these matters grows in the chief financial officer’s office. With that in mind, we offer this brief accounting lesson.

Reinventing the Chief Marketing Officer: An Interview with Unilever CMO Keith Weed

Read the full story in the Harvard Business Review.

A marketing revolution is under way and nowhere is that more visible than in the CMO’s transforming role. Unilever CMO Keith Weed embodies this new order as an architect and leader of the firm’s plan to double revenue while halving its environmental impact. In this edited interview, Weed describes a new breed of marketing organization, and the CMO’s increasingly strategic role.