Green business

This is the Fortune 500 of companies taking the lead to fight climate change

Read the full story from Quartz.

CDP, a British environmental nonprofit, receives data from almost 2,000 companies around the world showing what they do to fight climate change. From that, the group has compiled a list of the 187 best companies—firms such as Apple, Samsung, and BMW—into a kind of elite (and much smaller) Fortune 500 for environmentally-conscious companies, dubbed the Climate Performance Leadership Index (CPLI), and it says those companies are outperforming the rest of the market. The CPLI returned 37.5% from 2010-2014 (pdf) to investors, compared with 34.2% for the Bloomberg World Index.

Interface’s Net-Works program brings fish net recycling to Africa

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

Last month, the Net-Works team had the honor of being in the heart of New York City during Climate Week, participating in the Clinton Global Initiative.

For the past two years, the Net-Works team, made up of changemakers within Interface and the Zoological Society of London, has been dedicated to designing and proving an inclusive business model. This model enables impoverished fishing communities in the Philippines to collect damaging, discarded fishing nets from the ocean and shores. The nets are sold to our yarn supplier, which recycles the nets into nylon yarn that we use in our carpets.

Net-Works in the Philippines has been a success because of the time and dedication committed by our partnership. Making the decision to participate in the Clinton Global Initiative was difficult for us because the time and resources needed to properly make our “commitment to action” and attend the event were time and resources not going directly to the work on the ground.

Webcast: How Green Product Claims Affect Purchase Intent and Brand Perception

November 8, 2014 1-2 pm CST
Register at http://info.greenbiz.com/11-18-2014ULWebcast.html?src=calendar

Great sustainable product stories, told well, can generate enormous benefits. That’s why leading global brands have made sustainable products and processes — and the effective communication of their efforts — a high priority.

But telling a sustainability story is rife with risks. Making unsubstantiated claims can damage your brand’s reputation and strain customer loyalty. On the other hand, communicating your sustainability efforts in a credible and compelling way can influence consumer purchase intent and brand perception.

How do you tell your product story effectively? That’s what UL Environment set out to uncover with a study, conducted by Shelton Group, that polled more than 1,000 consumers and conducted more than 40,000 head-to-head green product claim comparisons.

In this hour-long webcast, you’ll hear the key findings from that study and hear a discussion about how to leverage this information to enhance your company’s sustainability story to drive greater brand value.

Among the things you’ll learn:

  • What consumers want to know related to green product claims
  • The impact of green product claims on purchase intent
  • How consumers view claims that are vague or misleading

 

The Boston Safe Shops Model: An Integrated Approach to Community Environmental and Occupational Health

Cora Roelofs, Paul Shoemaker, Tiffany Skogstrom, Persio Acevedo, Jumaane Kendrick, and Nancie Nguyen. The Boston Safe Shops Model: An Integrated Approach to Community Environmental and Occupational Health. American Journal of Public Health: April 2010, Vol. 100, No. S1, pp. S52-S55. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2009.176511

Abstract: Small, immigrant-owned businesses, such as auto repair shops and nail salons, often face barriers to environmental and occupational health compliance and may be a source of neighborhood pollution complaints. The Boston Public Health Commission established the Safe Shops Project to improve safety and environmental practices in such businesses using a community partnership model that incorporates enforcement inspection findings, worker training, technical assistance, and referral to health care and business resources. This integrated technical assistance approach has led to improved occupational health and environmental conditions, adoption of pollution prevention technologies, novel problem-solving, and dozens of health screenings and insurance referrals for workers and their neighbors.

Yale Journal: How, When, and Why Industrial Ecology is Good for Business

Read the full post from Yale University.

Industrial ecology, a rapidly growing field focused on sustainable production and consumption, has contributed numerous important tools to modern environmental management — life cycle assessment; “industrial symbiosis,” or the by-product exchange between neighboring facilities; “design for environment”; and the use of material flow analysis to track resource use in supply chains, companies, and economies.

A new special feature of Yale’s Journal of Industrial Ecology, titled “Industrial Ecology as a Source of Competitive Advantage,” presents new research on how, when, and why the use of industrial ecology by business can lead to cost savings, higher profits, and other, more intangible, business benefits…

Articles in the special feature will be freely available online for a limited time.

The Journal of Industrial Ecology is a bimonthly peer-reviewed scientific journal, owned by Yale University, published by Wiley-Blackwell and headquartered at the Yale University School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.

Who Are This Year’s Innovators Tackling Climate Change and Promoting Energy Efficiency?

Read the full post at EPA Connect.

The 2014 winners of the Presidential Green Chemistry Awards have done it again.  These scientists are helping to crack the code and solve some of the most challenging problems facing our modern society. They are turning climate risk and other problems into a business opportunity, spurring innovation and investment. They are reducing waste – energy, chemicals and water waste – while cutting manufacturing costs, and sparking investments.