Funding

NOAA Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise Program

Applications Due: November 18, 2014
Eligible Entities: institutions of higher education; non-profits; state, local, and tribal governments; commercial organizations; U.S. territories; and federal agencies

NOAA is seeking applications to support management of regional and local ecosystem effects of sea level rise and coastal inundation through targeted research on key technologies, natural and nature-based infrastructure, physical and biological processes, and model evaluation. The funding is intended to integrate dynamic physical and biological processes with sea level rise and coastal inundation to improve the prediction of coastal ecosystem effects to enable enhanced coastal resiliency.

USDA FY14 Rural Community Development Initiative

Applications Due: November 12, 2014
Eligible Entities: private, non-profit (including faith-based and community organizations and philanthropic organizations), or public (including tribal) organizations that provide financial and technical assistance to multiple recipients

The USDA is making available funds to develop the capacity and ability of qualified private, non-profit community-based housing and community development organizations, low-income rural communities, and federally recognized Native American tribes to undertake projects related to housing, community facilities, or community and economic development in rural areas. Applications that consider technical assistance for the development of renewable energy systems and energy efficiency improvements can receive additional consideration.

12th Annual P3 Awards: A National Student Design Competition for Sustainability Focusing on People, Prosperity and the Planet

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announces the posting of the Request for Applications, People, Prosperity and the Planet (P3) Award Program, with the goal to research, develop and design solutions to real world challenges involving the overall sustainability of human society. The P3 competition supports scientific and technological research efforts to create innovative projects focused on sustainability. The P3 Award program was developed to foster progress toward sustainability by achieving the mutual goals of improved quality of life, economic prosperity and protection of the planet- people, prosperity, and the planet – the three pillars of sustainability. The EPA offers the P3 competition in order to respond to the technical needs of the world while moving towards the goal of sustainability. Applications will be accepted from September 5-December 16, 2014.

Supporting the development of sustainable methods is in line with the Sustainable and Healthy Communities (SHC) Research Program. EPA’s SHC Research Program provides useful science and tools for decision makers at all levels to help communities advance sustainability as well as achieve regulatory compliance. SHC is collaborating with partners to conduct research that will result in science-based knowledge to guide decisions that will better sustain a healthy society and environment in America’s communities. The research is intended for decision-makers at the federal, regional, state and community levels.

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Provides Funding to Target Harmful Algal Blooms in Lake Erie

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy today announced that the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) will provide almost $12 million to federal and state agencies to protect public health by targeting harmful algal blooms (HABs) in western Lake Erie. The funding builds upon the GLRI’s on-going efforts to reduce algal blooms and will be made available to Ohio, Michigan and Indiana state agencies and to the U.S. Geological Survey, the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

“The importance of clean water cannot be overstated, which is why the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative is taking further action to target harmful algal blooms in western Lake Erie,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. “This important funding will address the immediate need for state and federal agencies to protect public health and build upon on-going efforts to reduce harmful algal blooms.”

The new FY 2014 funding will be used to:

  • Expand monitoring and forecasting to help drinking water treatment plant operators and beach managers minimize health impacts associated with HABs;
  • Increase incentives for farmers in western Lake Erie watersheds to reduce phosphorus runoff that contributes to HABs; and
  • Improve measurement of phosphorus loads in Lake Erie tributaries.

In early August, the City of Toledo issued a “Do Not Drink” order for almost 500,000 people in northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan when a drinking water treatment plant was adversely impacted by microcystin, a toxin produced in connection with HAB outbreaks on Lake Erie. In addition to generating toxins that pose risks to human health, HABs create low oxygen “dead zones” and harm shoreline economies.

On August 13, EPA Regional Administrator, Susan Hedman, convened a meeting of federal and state agencies to identify opportunities for collaboration to minimize HAB-related risks in the western Lake Erie Basin. GLRI funding announced today targets immediate needs identified during that meeting. The group will continue to focus resources on this issue in FY 2015 and beyond.

McCarthy, who chairs the Great Lakes Interagency Task Force, which oversees the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, made the announcement today at the task force meeting in Washington, D.C.

The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative was launched in 2010 to accelerate efforts to protect and restore the largest system of fresh surface water in the world. GLRI resources are used to strategically target the biggest threats to the Great Lakes ecosystem and to accelerate progress toward long term goals which includes eliminating harmful algal blooms. Under the initial GLRI Action Plan, GLRI resources doubled the acreage enrolled in agricultural conservation programs in the western Lake Erie, Saginaw Bay and Green Bay watersheds where nutrient runoff contributes to harmful algal blooms. Under the new GLRI Action Plan, which covers 2015-2019, projects to reduce nutrient loads from these agricultural watersheds will continue. Watershed management and green infrastructure projects to reduce untreated runoff from urban watersheds will also continue.

Information about the GLRI: http://www.glri.us/

Captain Planet Foundation Grants

The Captain Planet Foundation funds and supports hands-on environmental projects for students. Its objective is to encourage innovative programs that empower students around the world to work individually and collectively to solve environmental problems in their local communities. Grant amounts range from $250 to $2,500. Deadlines for submitting grant applications are September 30 and January 31.

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Small Grants: Student Research Awards 2015 Call for Proposals

Due: Friday, October 31, 2014

The Illinois Water Resources Center (IWRC) requests proposals to fund promising graduate and undergraduate student research projects addressing Illinois water resources. We are particularly interested in projects that seek solutions for or provide novel identification of pressing water concerns in Illinois. PI’s can request up to $10,000. Project duration is March 1, 2015-February 28, 2016.

For more information visit: http://web.extension.illinois.edu/iwrc/pdf/2015%20RFP.pdf

Questions:

Lisa Merrifield
lmorrisn@illinois.edu
217-333-0045

Bond Financing Distributed Water systems: How to Make Better Use of Our Most Liquid Market for Financing Water infrastructure

Download the document. Requires free registration.

Across the country, communities are experiencing more extreme hydrology. In some places, this takes the form of deepening drought that necessitates stronger commitments to conservation. In others, it takes the form of more frequent flooding that overwhelms water infrastructure, sending raw sewage into urban rivers or even into city streets. Some places are experiencing both intensifying drought and flood.

As a growing number of water planners across the country are recognizing, these challenges cannot be solved solely by building new reservoirs, pipelines and treatment plants. Given current financial and ecological constraints, utilities will have to embrace a new form of infrastructure if they intend to provide reliable, reasonably priced water services.