Food processing

Coffee roaster abuzz with waste prevention strategy

In his P2 Impact article for GreenBiz, Justin Lehrer from StopWaste Business Partnership shares how America’s Best Coffee Roasting Company has been brewing a strategy to reduce waste and improve operational efficiency, realizing savings along the way.

Read previous articles from the P2 Impact column here.

13 companies sowing solutions for food resilience

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

Could Big Data offer the most fertile solution for countering systemic food waste and frightening future scarcity scenarios?

Last month Microsoft, Amazon Web Services, Coca-Cola, Nestlé and dozens of other companies started sowing the seeds for a crop of powerful applications and information resources enabled by the convergence of sensors, sophisticated imagery and powerful analytics — and inspired by the federal Climate Data Initiative.

Their focus: “food resilience” innovations that help agricultural businesses, farmers and food distributors more quickly understand the potential impacts of floods, rising sea levels, heat waves and droughts, downpours and other extreme weather on crop yields, transportation systems, storage and other supply-chain processes.

Farmers Generate Energy from Coffee Wastewater

Read the full story in Environmental Leader.

It is possible to generate energy, tackle climate change and protect water resources by treating discharges from coffee mills, according to project findings by UTZ Certified.

The Energy from Coffee Wastewater project was launched by UTZ Certified in 2010 in Central America with the goal of addressing environmental and health problems caused by the wastewater produced in the coffee industry.

Big Food to divulge chemical info

Read the full story at Politico.

Food companies are trying to beat the federal government’s push to make chemicals in food more transparent.

The Grocery Manufacturers Association, which represents America’s biggest food companies, announced a major new initiative Wednesday that will give the Food and Drug Administration access to a large database of safety information for chemicals commonly used in processed foods, from Twinkies to almond milk.

Mars: To transform raw materials supply, we must work together

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

Mars has just published its fourth annual Principles in Action Summary, which details how the company runs its huge business. And it makes for interesting reading.

This 100-year-old family-owned, family-run company has net sales of more than $33 billion. It has six business units (including chocolate, pet care and food and drink), 75,000 staff dotted in locations across the planet and a plethora of well-known brands (from Galaxy and Uncle Ben’s to Sheba and Skittles). And it well understands its position in the world and wants to drive positive change at the intersections where it can make a big difference — not least in driving better practices in farms in the developing world.

At the offices of the company’s London-based communications agency, I caught up with Mars’s global sustainability director, Kevin Rabinovitch, to find out how the business is using its scale to create change where it is needed most.