Environment

Revving Up Energy Solutions Innovation

Read the full story in R&D Magazine.

During the 2014 R&D 100 Awards event, R&D Magazine expanded the banquet to hold four technology panels during the day. The last panel of the day focused on energy/environmental solutions and the innovation behind four R&D 100-winning technologies and the complexity of bringing such technologies to the market.

Speakers of the panel included Nicolas Dube, Distinguished Technologist, HP; Qichao Hu, Founder and CEO, SolidEnergy Systems; Ty McNutt, Director of Business Development, APEI Inc.; and Edward Williams, CEO, Novinda. Each gave feedback as to the issues of creating new energy/environmental solutions and the complexity of the innovation process.

Stockholm Environment Institute

From The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout 1994-2014.

The Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) is an independent international research institute. For over 25 years SEI has been gathering data on the interrelated systems of development and ecology, bringing together diverse stakeholders for dialogues and partnerships. For the past several years, the organization has focused its efforts on four targeted activities: Managing environmental systems, Reducing climate risk, Transforming governance, and Rethinking development. Scout the site first by clicking on each of these categories to reveal theme summaries, sub-themes, and theme fact sheets. From there, have a look at the News & Media, Projects, Tools, and People tabs. One of the most exciting aspects of this site is the Recent Publications column, where you can read free empirical articles on such topics as “The economic case for low carb” and “A new era in the fight against deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon.” [CNH]

UNESCO partners with Nature Education and Roche to launch the World Library of Science: a free online science education resource

UNESCO launched the UNESCO World Library of Science (WLoS), a newly created, free online science education resource for a global community of users. Developed through the joint efforts of UNESCO, Nature Education, and Roche, the WLoS was created to give students around the world, especially those in disadvantaged regions, access to the latest science information as well as the opportunity to share their experiences and learning through discussion with their peers in a shared learning environment.

Launched on the occasion of World Science Day for Peace and Development 2014, the WLoS is a science resource library stocked with over 300 top-quality articles, 25 eBooks, and over 70 videos from the publishers of Nature, the most cited scientific journal in the world. It is also a state-of-the-art digital platform that provides a community hub for learning. Users can join classes, build groups and connect with other learners.

Specifically, the WLoS seeks to make science learning accessible to students everywhere in the world by:

  • Helping equalize learning opportunities. The WLoS is open to all at no cost. It provides students with access to high-quality educational material, regardless of geography or economic circumstances. UNESCO will dedicate special attention to training teachers and students in least developed countries in how to use the WLoS, accelerating science learning in disadvantaged regions.
  • Improving the quality of teaching and learning. The WLoS supports teachers and students worldwide by giving educators concrete ideas about how to present complex scientific concepts and students resources to fuel and complement their learning. The website provides a searchable database of content that is peer-reviewed.
  • Strengthening science education. Scientific understanding is the foundation of sustainable development and prepares learners for employment.
  • Promoting the use of open educational resources. The WLoS content is open. It can be tailored and shared for any educational or non-commercial use. The WLoS is founded on the idea that educational content and scientific knowledge should be free and accessible to all.
  • Connecting communities of students and teachers. The WLoS is more than just a traditional library: it is a dynamic resource that allows users to collaborate with others, personalize their learning experience, pose and answer questions, and collaborate with others while exploring scientific concepts. The WLoS fosters knowledge-sharing and peer-learning.

Icann: environmentalists to control use of .eco internet domain name

Read the full story in The Guardian.

The .eco domain name will be controlled by the environmental community following a decision by internet regulators.

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (Icann) this week granted control of the domain name to a coalition of about 50 environmental groups, assembled by a Canadian company. Green NGOs have fought to control the domain because they feared it would be hijacked by corporations to give their commercial activities an unwarranted environmental tinge.

Jacob Malthouse, co-founder of Big Room Inc, the Canadian company that led the effort, said Icann’s decision was a victory against greenwashing.

Wheat growth and yield responses to biochar addition under Mediterranean climate conditions

Manuel Olmo, José Antonio Alburquerque, Vidal Barrón, María Carmen del Campillo, Antonio Gallardo, Mariano Fuentes,
Rafael Villar (2014). ” Wheat growth and yield responses to biochar addition under Mediterranean climate conditions.” Biology and Fertility of Soils Online ahead of print. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00374-014-0959-y

Abstract: The effects of the addition of a slow pyrolysis biochar (produced from olive-tree prunings) to a vertisol were studied in a field experiment during one wheat (Triticum durum L.) growing season. The biochar addition did not significantly affect soil parameters such as pH, dissolved organic C and N, ammonium, nitrate or microbial biomass N. By contrast, biochar addition decreased soil compaction and increased the soil water-retention capacity and nutrient content (total N and the available contents of P, K, Mg, Cu and Zn). These favourable changes led to an increase in fine root proliferation (increasing specific root length and reducing root tissue density) and promoted crop development. As a result, the plants in biochar-treated plots showed higher relative growth and net assimilation rates, aboveground biomass and yield than those in control plots. Neither grain quality nor nutrient content were significantly affected by biochar addition. Our results suggest that the use of biochar as a soil amendment in agricultural soils can improve soil physical properties and increase fertility, favouring crop development under semiarid Mediterranean conditions.

University of Minnesota Institute on Environment Fall Seminar series

This fall, Frontiers in the Environment will ask some BIG QUESTIONS and host solutions-focused conversations about the next wave of research and discovery. Held at noon Wednesdays in St. Paul or online, each session includes a lively 30-minute discussion followed by Q&A and a networking reception. Here’s the schedule through October.

9/24 – IonE resident fellow Matteo Convertino, an IonE resident fellow and assistant professor in the School of Public Health, and Craig Hedberg, SPH professor, discuss how computer models can predict and deal with foodborne disease outbreaks in Can We Build a More Resilient Food Distribution System?

10/1 – Get a peek at IonE’s recently launched Energy Transition Lab when the lab’s executive director, Ellen Anderson, and faculty director, Hari Osofsky, ask How Can the University of Minnesota Assist in the Energy Transition?

10/8 – A panel of urban planning experts, including Patrick Hamilton, IonE resident fellow and director of the Science Museum of Minnesota’s Global Change Initiatives; Ann Hunt, environmental policy director for the City of St. Paul; Peter Frosch, director of Strategic Partnerships, Greater MSP; and Mike Greco, program director of the Resilient Communities Project, will focus on cities of the future in How Might the Twin Cities Catalyze Needed Global Urban Innovations?

10/15 – IonE’s Natural Capital Project lead Steve Polasky, IonE resident fellow and professor in the College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences, will lead a discussion of the big question, Should Society Put a Price Tag on Nature?

10/22 – What Does a Sustainable Clean Water Future for Minnesota Look Like? is the question to be considered by panelists Bonnie Keeler, Natural Capital Project lead scientist; Deb Swackhamer, Water Resources Center program director; and John Linc Stine, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency commissioner.

10/29 – Political thought leaders David Gillette, special correspondent for Twin Cities Public Television; Amy Koch, small business owner and former Minnesota senate majority leader; and Mark Andrew, president of Greenmark, will dive into What is the Role of the Environment in This Year’s Minnesota Elections?

View the complete fall schedule or browse the archives here 

Happy Pollution Prevention Week

Pollution Prevention (P2) Week, held during the third week of September each year, highlights the efforts of organizations across the country in making pollution prevention a cornerstone of sustainability. The 2014 theme is “Pollution Prevention: The Clear Choice for Environmental Sustainability.”

The National Pollution Prevention Roundtable and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have information about events occurring throughout the country. NPPR also has a handy P2 Week Toolkit for organizations looking for ways to participate.

The Great Lakes Regional Pollution Prevention Roundtable will be posting each day about a different aspect of pollution prevention. Check out their blog and Twitter feed (look for the #P2Week hashtag) for information and resources.

2014 P2 Week Poster