Hawaii’s Governor Dumps Oil and Gas in Favor of 100 Percent Renewables

Read the full story in The Nation.

At the Asia Pacific Resilience Innovation Summit held in Honolulu, Hawaii, this week, Governor David Ige dropped a bombshell. His administration will not use natural gas to replace the state’s petroleum-fueled electricity plants, but will make a full-court press toward 100 percent renewables by 2045. Ige’s decisive and ambitious energy vision is making Hawaii into the world’s most important laboratory for humankind’s fight against climate change. He has, in addition, attracted an unlikely and enthusiastic partner in his embrace of green energy—the US military.

Wind and solar surge sends EU emissions tumbling

Read the full story at Climate News Network.

Europe’s greenhouse gas emissions are falling fast, mainly because of the rapid spread of the wind turbines and solar panels that are replacing fossil fuels for electricity generation.

European Union data shows that once countries adopt measures to reduce greenhouse gases (GHGs), they often exceed their targets − and this finding is backed up by figures released this week in a statement by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

The Convention’s statistics show that the 37 industrialised countries (plus the EU) that signed up in 1997 to the Kyoto Protocol − the original international treaty on combating global warming – have frequently exceeded their promised GHG cuts by a large margin.

Germany Is Showing the Rest of the World How to Tackle Global Warming

Read the full story at Mic.com. (H/T to Charlotte Roh for the link).

On Sunday, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton unveiled the first major commitments of her climate change policy. Her plan centers on dramatically increasing renewable energy sources in the United States, with the goal of having 33% of the country’s power generation come from renewable sources by 2027. While commentators debate how realistic her goals are and whether they’re adequate for meeting the challenge of climate change, they might do well to look across the Atlantic for some inspiration.

Last week, Germany hit an extraordinary milestone: On July 25th, 78% of the country’s electricity was generated by renewable energy sources.

Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Lands, Landfills, and Mine Sites

EPA is encouraging renewable energy development on current and formerly contaminated lands, landfills, and mine sites when it is aligned with the community’s vision for the site. This initiative identifies the renewable energy potential of these sites and provides other useful resources for communities, developers, industry, state and local governments or anyone interested in reusing these sites for renewable energy development.

Bloomington, Ill., Power Deal to Emphasize Renewable Sources

Read the full story in The Pantagraph (via FutureStructure).

The city of Bloomington, Ill., has decided to accept $100,000 a year less from the community’s electricity provider in exchange for stressing renewable energy sources.

The City Council voted 7-1 to modify its electric aggregation agreement with Homefield Energy to make the trade-off to achieve the equivalent of drawing its electricity solely from renewable sources.

Study: All 50 States Could Run On Renewable Energy By 2050

Read the full story at Manufacturing.Net.

A new study by California researchers outlines a pathway for all 50 states to run entirely on renewable energy by 2050.

The researchers, led by Stanford University engineering professor Mark Jacobson, calculated states’ power demands if all fuel consumption was replaced with electricity, then examined their potential for various renewable sources to accommodate that demand.

The report, published in the journal Energy and Environmental Sciences, mapped each state’s capability to capture solar energy as well as the potential for wind farms located either on land or offshore. Geothermal energy could be an option for 13 states, while other sources could come from tides and from upgrades to current hydroelectric dams.

DOE initiatives launch as part of Clean Energy Investment Summit

Read the full story in Biomass Magazine.

The Department of Energy has announced several new and expanding initiatives as part of the administration’s Clean Energy Investment Summit, including the launch of a Clean Energy Impact Investment Center, which will work to make the department’s resources more readily available to the public, including to mission-driven investors.