Cooling the Cloud: Binghamton PhD Student Sets Sights on Improving Data-Center Efficiency

Read the full story from Binghampton University.

Data centers — large clusters of servers that power cloud computing operations, e-commerce and more — are one of the largest and fastest-growing consumers of electricity in the United States.

The industry has been shifting from open-air cooling of these facilities to increasingly complex systems that segregate hot air from cold air. When it comes to cost savings, there are definite advantages to the aisle containment systems, which have been estimated to save 30 percent of cooling energy — but it’s not yet clear how they increase the risk of overheating, or how to design them for greatest safety and optimum energy efficiency.

That’s what Husam Alissa, a doctoral candidate in mechanical engineering, is trying to determine at Binghamton University’s state-of-the-art Center for Energy-Smart Electronic Systems (ES2).

 

Bringing energy efficiency to the middle class

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

Pay As You Save (PAYS) is a financing intervention that hopes to address the rural middle-income market by enabling utility customers to purchase and install cost-effective energy-efficiency upgrades without upfront payment, personal loans or property liens. PAYS was one of four interventions that won the Finance for Resilience (FiRe) prize at the Bloomberg New Energy Finance Future of Energy Summit 2015.

Looking to Rent Energy-Efficient Housing?

Read the full story in Governing.

In an effort to make rentals more sustainable, 14 college towns banded together to create a website that shows people what they would pay in utilities.

Counting All Costs, Berkeley Lab Researchers Find that Saving Energy Is Still Cheap

Read the full story from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

What does it cost to save electricity?

Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have conducted the most comprehensive study yet of the full cost of saving electricity by U.S. utility efficiency programs and now have an answer: 4.6 cents. That’s the average total cost of saving a kilowatt-hour in 20 states from 2009 to 2013, according to a Berkeley Lab report titled, The Total Cost of Saving Electricity Through Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs: Estimates at the National, State, Sector and Program Level, released today. To arrive at that average, researchers collected and analyzed several hundred regulatory documents filed in each state by utilities and other administrators of efficiency programs that are funded by utility customers.

On the road to bipartisan energy efficiency legislation

Read the full story from ACEEE.

Now that one energy efficiency bill is before the president, the real legislative work on energy efficiency begins. The Energy Efficiency Improvement Act of 2015 (S. 535) is three steps forward, a collection of three useful but relatively modest provisions on residential water heaters and commercial buildings. But there is a long way to go.

Could secondary markets help companies pay for energy efficiency?

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

Some investors are looking with anticipation toward the development of secondary markets for energy efficiency in the United States.

To provide an inside perspective on why these markets are crucial today, authors of the report “Accessing Secondary Markets as a Capital Source for Energy Efficiency Finance Programs: Program Design Considerations for Policymakers and Administrators” spoke with Clean Energy Finance Forum.