Petition Seeks Overhaul of U.S. EPA Testing Following VW Scandal

Read the full story from Bloomberg News.

An environmental group is seeking to have every model of car and light trucks sold in the U.S. undergo on-the-road emissions tests, adding to calls for more aggressive efforts following revelations that Volkswagen AG rigged its vehicles to fool laboratory-based screening.

EU probes TV makers over energy efficiency test scores

Read the full story from the BBC.

The European Commission says it is “following up” two reports that raise concerns that software used in TVs may be skewing their energy rating scores.

One study indicates that some Samsung TVs nearly halve their power consumption when a standardised test is carried out.

Another accuses a different unnamed manufacturer of adjusting the brightness of its sets when they “recognise” the test film involved.

Samsung has denied any wrongdoing.

3 things EDF Climate Corps taught me about talking energy efficiency

Read the full post at GreenBiz.

Energy efficiency isn’t sexy — but that doesn’t mean it can’t be sold if positioned correctly.

Here are some new tools to support local energy efficiency

Read the full post from ACEEE.

Each step of a home improvement project requires the right tool. If you are planning to put up a new set of cabinets, for example, the first step requires measuring tape, assembly of the cabinets may require a drill, and then, finally, a hammer would be needed to actually mount them. A variety of tools—the right tools—are needed to complete the task.

This logic is no different when applied to the planning, design, and implementation of energy efficiency policies. Tools can provide localities with the know-how to advance energy efficiency throughout their communities. Policymakers, for example, can be tasked with assessing what energy efficiency policies make the most sense for their community, or with identifying which local stakeholders they should engage. The extent to which communities are equipped to readily answer those questions will vary; yet, all communities stand to benefit from learning about effective policies and strategies being implemented across the country. With the addition of some new resources, ACEEE hopes to expand communities’ toolboxes and provide the tools that help them achieve lasting energy savings.

The International Energy Efficiency Scorecard

Download the document.

The International Energy Efficiency Scorecard ranks the world’s largest economies on their energy efficiency policies and programs. The rankings include Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Russia, South Korea, Spain, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the European Union.

Thirty-one different energy efficiency indicators have been analyzed for each economy ranked in the report. The rankings are determined by scoring out of 100 possible points. Points can be earned in four different categories, including buildings, industry, transportation, and national effort, which measures overall or cross-cutting indicators of energy use at the national level.

Energy Efficiency in the Clean Power Plan: Take One

Read the full post from ACEEE.

On August 3rd, EPA released the final Clean Power Plan (CPP), a rule that sets performance rates and individual state targets for carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants. Now that the emissions targets are set, energy efficiency plays a prominent role as a proven strategy that states can use to reduce energy, cut emissions, and boost the economy. As we have said, it’s not important that energy efficiency is no longer a CPP building block. The fact is that it’s prominently featured as a key compliance option for states in EPA’s materials (see Energy Efficiency TSD and Key Topics and Issues Fact Sheet), as a component of the rule’s Regulatory Impact Analysis, and even in the president’s speech announcing the rule.

Now that we’ve had time for a first read-through of the final rule, we’ve found some significant changes from the proposed version.

UF/IFAS study sheds light on how willing we are to adjust our energy bills

Read the full story from the University of Florida.

All it takes is six questions. You answer those, and University of Florida researchers say contractors will know how willing you are to upgrade your home for energy efficiency and whether you can afford the improvements.

Heating and cooling make up 54 percent of American households’ utility bills, a primary concern for Randy Cantrell, a UF/IFAS assistant professor and Extension specialist in housing and community development. For some people, their monthly energy bill comes as sticker shock. But we all react differently when we open the envelope, and Cantrell calls that response “botheredness.”…

The study was published online June 4 in the Society of Civil Engineers’ Journal of Architectural Engineering.