FedEx, United bet it’s (finally) time for jet biofuels to take off

Read the full story in GreenBiz.

Aviation biofuels are on the rise again thanks to airlines like Virgin, Southwest and United, as well as buy-in from manufacturers and logistics providers Boeing and FedEx.

Power Your Car With a Biofuel Made From Beer

Read the full story in CityLab.

Beer—is there anything it can’t do?

You can chug it to improve the watchability of baseball, use it to de-ice roads, and now even power your car with it, thanks to the New Zealand biofuel “Brewtroleum.” The ethanol used in the greener gas, which was dreamed up by DB Export, is derived from leftovers of the brewing process, chiefly grain and yeast.

Farm Waste and Animal Fats Will Help Power a United Jet

Read the full story in the New York Times.

Sometime this summer, a United Airlines flight will take off from Los Angeles International Airport bound for San Francisco using fuel generated from farm waste and oils derived from animal fats.

Unlocking fermentation secrets open the door to new biofuels

Read the full story from the University of Illinois.

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have, for the first time, uncovered the complex interdependence and orchestration of metabolic reactions, gene regulation, and environmental cues of clostridial metabolism, providing new insights for advanced biofuel development…

“In this study, we developed an integrated computational framework for the analysis and exploitation of the solvent metabolism by C. acetobutylicum,” said Chen Liao, a bioengineering graduate student and first author of the paper, “Integrated, Systems Metabolic Picture of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum,” appearing in this week’s Early Edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.

 

Land management practices to become important as biofuels use grows

Read the full story from Argonne National Laboratory.

The handling of agricultural crop residues appears to have a large impact on soil’s ability to retain carbon, making land management practices increasingly important, especially under a scenario where cellulosic materials become more heavily used as a feedstock for ethanol production, according to a recently published study led by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory.

BESC, Mascoma develop revolutionary microbe for biofuel production

Read the full story from Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Biofuels pioneer Mascoma LLC and the Department of Energy’s BioEnergy Science Center have developed a revolutionary strain of yeast that could help significantly accelerate the development of biofuels from nonfood plant matter.

The approach could provide a pathway to eventual expansion of biofuels production beyond the current output limited to ethanol derived from corn…

Researchers announced that while conventional yeast leaves more than one-third of the biomass sugars unused in the form of xylose, Mascoma’s C5 FUEL™ efficiently converts this xylose into ethanol, and it accomplishes this feat in less than 48 hours. The finding was presented today at the 31st International Fuel Ethanol Workshop in Minneapolis.

Esterification of glycerol over a solid acid biochar catalyst derived from waste biomass

N. Lingaiah, Mahammad Rafi J., Rajashekar A, Srinivas M, BVSK Rao and Prasad B N R. (2015). “Esterification of glycerol over a solid acid biochar catalyst derived from waste biomass.” RSC Advances online ahead of print. DOI: 10.1039/C5RA06613A

Abstract: Karanja seed shells were subjected to pyrolysis in inert atmosphere at different temperatures to prepare biochar. The biochar was characterized by X-ray diffraction, FT-infra red, Laser Raman, thermo gravimetric analysis, CHNS-elemental analysis, BET surface area and temperature programmed desorption of ammonia. These biochar carbon catalysts were used as catalysts without any functionalization/treatment for the esterification of glycerol with acetic acid. Carbonization at 400 oC led to the formation of biochar with more number of strong acidic sites. High temperature carbonization amorphous carbon composed of aromatic carbon sheets oriented in a considerably random fashion. The biochar obtained at 400 oC exhibited highest glycerol esterification activity. The catalytic activity of the biochar was explained based on its properties derived from different characterization methods. The biochar catalyst can be reusable with consistent activity.