Twelve college campuses leading the way for sustainable dining

Read the full story in the Christian Science Monitor.

Many cafeterias around the United States are working to provide students with healthy, sustainable meal options. To do this, colleges and universities are changing the way that they purchase and prepare food in their cafeterias, and many of them are beginning to source food locally.

 

 

Greening Game Day, and Every Day in Between

Read the full story in Sierra Magazine.

Nationwide, more than 460,000 college-student athletes compete across 23 sports annually. All those games draw a lot of spectators, a fact that CU-Boulder Environmental Center director Dave Newport is keenly aware of. “The power of sports to influence fans’ behavior is profound,” he says, and is one reason he’s worked to extend university-wide green initiatives into the athletic department.

Illini Gadget Garage will provide a space to repair electronics on University of Illinois campus

Read the full story from the University of Illinois.

You’ve dropped your cellphone and cracked the screen. Or your computer needs a memory upgrade, the headphone jack no longer works or the hard drive has failed.

You’ve had the electronics for several years, and you could just buy the latest device with the newest features.

Or you could fix the one you have. If repairing an electronic device yourself sounds prohibitively complex and you aren’t sure where to start, help will soon be available on the University of Illinois campus.

The Illini Gadget Garage will open this semester. It will be a place for collaborative repair, modeled after the Campus Bike Center, only for electronics.

Solar Decathlon: The Search for The Best Carbon-Neutral House

Read the full story in e360 Digest.

What’s the latest in well-designed, energy-efficient solar homes? The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has invited teams from colleges across the country to design and build solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient, and attractive. The model houses designed by 15 collegiate teams will be on display and open for public tours this October in Irvine, California, where the DOE’s seventh Solar Decathlon will be taking place. In addition to functioning as comfortable homes — each must produce plenty of hot water, for example, and have working appliances for cooking, cleaning, and entertaining — the houses must produce at least as much energy as they consume. This year’s competition will, for the first time, also emphasize affordability. To earn the highest marks, each team is aiming to build a home that costs less than $250,000.

The Latest Thing in Green: FIT students test environmentally friendly ways to reuse textiles

Read the full story in the Wall Street Journal.

Mention the Fashion Institute of Technology, and green innovation isn’t the first thing that springs to mind. But two FIT students are undertaking a project that they hope will make the fashion industry’s use of textiles more environmentally friendly.

While the recycling of plastic, aluminum and paper is now commonplace, the recycling of organic fabric is rare, because no one has come up with an easy, environmentally friendly way to do it.

But Lydia Baird and Willa Tsokanis hope to change that. Students in FIT’s textile development and marketing program, they found themselves asking why the school routinely tossed out reams of muslin, a cheap strain of cotton used throughout the industry to test designs, once students were finished with it. While biodegradable, it takes longer to break down when mixed with other landfill refuse.

Campus Food Waste Crusaders

Read the full post from Sustainable America. If you’re in Illinois, be sure to check out ISTC’s Green Lunchroom Challenge to reduce food waste in your K-12 school. Read ISTC’s blog post for more information.

The amount of food waste generated on college campuses might not cross every student’s mind as they rush through the cafeteria before class. But if they looked into it, they would learn that 22 million pounds of edible food is thrown away at college campuses each year. Two inspiring organizations are working to change that.

Campus Kitchens Project and Food Recovery Network have been mobilizing an army of students around the country who are working to raise awareness about the food waste problem and get food that would be wasted to people in need in their communities. We reported on these groups a few years ago, but their recent accomplishments deserve an update.