Awards & contests

R&D 100 Awards now accepting applications

Entry Deadline: April 20, 2015
For more information and to enter, visit http://www.rd100awards.com/

Known widely as “the Oscars of Invention,” the R&D 100 Awards allows you to stand shoulder-to-shoulder and compete with the elite of the research & development world. With the countless hours and substantial resources invested to bring it to market, your new product deserves to be showcased along with the year’s most significant new technology.

Winning an R&D 100 Award will enhance your product’s marketability and deliver a message that your organization and development team are leaders and innovators. An R&D 100 Award:

  • provides a positive initial marketing boost to many new technology innovations
  • recognizes the efforts of the development team and partners
  • signifies a mark of excellence known to industry, government, and consumers
  • tells potential customers that the product has successfully competed against other new technologies in open competition

This year, there are four Special Recognition Awards: Green Technology, Corporate Social Responsibility, and two “Market Disruptors,” one for products and one for services.

Entries submitted before February 6, 2015 are eligible for early review by R&D Magazine editors. Upon request, the editors will provide recommendations to improve the entry and increase your chances of winning an Award. Revised entries must be submitted by April 20, 2015.

Biomimicry Global Design Challenge

The Biomimicry Institute and the Ray C. Anderson Foundation are inviting professionals and students from across the world to participate in a Biomimicry Global Design Challenge. Using biomimicry as a tool, participants are invited to tap into nature-inspired solutions to help solve key food and agriculture issues like food waste, food packaging, agricultural pest management, food distribution, energy use, and more. Participants may be featured in high profile media, will have access to biomimicry experts and mentors, and can compete for cash prizes totaling $160,000, including the Ray C. Anderson Foundation $100,000 “Ray of Hope” Prize.

 

2015 Saving Endangered Species Youth Art Contest

The Endangered Species Coalition (ESC) is pleased to announce our 2015 Saving Endangered Species youth art contest, which is open to K-12 grade students residing in the United States, including those who are homeschooled or belong to a youth/art program. The contest is an integral part of the 10th annual national Endangered Species Day on May 15, 2015. For more background on the contest, including an art lesson plan for teachers and other resources, please visit www.endangeredspeciesday.org.

 

Rockefeller Foundation Announces Second Set of Resilient Cities

The Rockefeller Foundation recently announced the second group of cities selected to join the 100 Resilient Cities Challenge – comprised of cities that have demonstrated a commitment to building their own capacities to navigate the shocks and stresses of an increasingly complex 21st Century. During the first 18 months of this program, the first cohort of cities matured, appointed chief resilience officers, and embarked on their own resilience strategy processes.

Responses to the second round of the 100 Resilient Cities Challenge included applications from cities around the world, submitted in seven languages. Each city was asked to present a clear and compelling description of their major resilience challenges, how they are approaching and planning for resilience to decrease vulnerabilities, and how they plan to partner with the Rockefeller Foundation.

NASA and U.S. Geological Survey Offer Climate Data App Challenge

In December 2014, NASA, in partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey, kicked off a challenge that offers more than $35,000 in prizes to citizen scientists for ideas that make use of climate data to address vulnerabilities faced by the United States as it copes with climate change.

The Climate Resilience Data Challenge is being conducted through the NASA Tournament Lab, a partnership with Harvard University and running through March 2015. The challenge supports the efforts of the White House Climate Data Initiative to leverage the Federal government’s freely available climate-relevant data resources to spur private-sector entrepreneurship to advance preparedness for the impacts of climate change.

The challenge begins with an ideation stage for data-driven application pitches, followed by storyboarding and, finally, prototyping of concepts with the greatest potential. For more information, visit: http://www.topcoder.com/earthscience/crdc/.

NASA-USGS Climate Data App Challenge: An Invitation for Innovation

NASA in partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is offering more than $35,000 in prizes to citizen scientists for ideas that make use of climate data to address vulnerabilities faced by the United States in coping with climate change.

The Climate Resilience Data Challenge, conducted through the NASA Tournament Lab, a partnership with Harvard University hosted on Appirio/Topcoder, kicks off Monday, Dec. 15 and runs through March 2015.

The challenge supports the efforts of the White House Climate Data Initiative, a broad effort to leverage the federal government’s extensive, freely available climate-relevant data resources to spur innovation and private-sector entrepreneurship in order to advance awareness of and preparedness for the impacts of climate change. The challenge was announced by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Dec. 9.

According to the recent National Climate Assessment produced by more than 300 experts across government and academia, the United States faces a number of current and future challenges as the result of climate change. Vulnerabilities include coastal flooding and weather-related hazards that threaten lives and property, increased disruptions to agriculture, prolonged drought that adversely affects food security and water availability, and ocean acidification capable of damaging ecosystems and biodiversity. The challenge seeks to unlock the potential of climate data to address these and other climate risks.

“Federal agencies, such as NASA and the USGS, traditionally focus on developing world-class science data to support scientific research, but the rapid growth in the innovation community presents new opportunities to encourage wider usage and application of science data to benefit society,” said Kevin Murphy, NASA program executive for Earth Science Data Systems in Washington. “We need tools that utilize federal data to help our local communities improve climate resilience, protect our ecosystems, and prepare for the effects of climate change.”

“Government science follows the strictest professional protocols because scientific objectivity is what the American people expect from us,” said Virginia Burkett, acting USGS associate director for Climate Change and Land Use. “That systematic approach is fundamental to our mission. With this challenge, however, we are intentionally looking outside the box for transformational ways to apply the data that we have already carefully assembled for the benefit of communities across the nation.”

The challenge begins with an ideation stage for data-driven application pitches, followed by storyboarding and, finally, prototyping of concepts with the greatest potential.

The ideation stage challenges competitors to imagine new applications of climate data to address climate vulnerabilities. This stage is divided into three competitive classes based on data sources: NASA data, federal data from agencies such as the USGS, and any open data. The storyboarding stage allows competitors to conceptualize and design the best ideas, followed by the prototyping stage, which carry the best ideas into implementation.

The Climate Resilience Data Challenge is managed by NASA’s Center of Excellence for Collaborative Innovation at NASA Headquarters, Washington. The center was established in coordination with the Office of Science and Technology Policy to advance open innovation efforts for climate-related science and extend that expertise to other federal agencies.

For additional information and to register (beginning Dec. 15), visit the Climate Resilience Data Challenge website.

Project to create sustainable magnets wins $10K prize

Read the full story from the University of Minnesota.

A project aimed at developing magnets that don’t require the use of rare earth elements captured the $10,000 top prize in a Dow Sustainability Innovation Student Challenge Award (SISCA) competition held Dec. 4 at the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment in St. Paul.